Jason's Spitfire with an alternative engine By John Moore
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The model in the photo's is a 60 size world models spitfire which has clocked up many hours. Owing to an unfortunate gravity induced incident the front end has been rebuilt and the plane is not so pretty on the ground. However she looks great in the air and sounds fairly awesome when being pulled around by an SC120 four stroke, which gives an impressive turn of speed. Currently she's fitted with a 91 four stroke as the 120 is now residing in a blackhorse P40C Tomahawk
A Merlin running at 65in.Hg. and 3200rpm. Photo was taken at the airpark where a friend, Graham White lives at Cannon Creek Airpark, Lake City, Florida
He has collected aircraft engines for about 25 years. Currently I have the Merlin, Griffon, P&W R-2800, P&W R-4360 (2), Franklin O-805 (flat 12) and Continental IV-1430. Due to the high manifold pressures he runs he recently added a water injection system to it as insurance against detonation. He has momentarily “blipped” the Merlin to 72in.Hg. and 3300rpm which is well beyond normal takeoff power and even war emergency. The QEC (power plant in Brit speak) is from a Canadair Northstar. I‘ve added modern spin-on oil filtration which filters to 5 microns. The unit he uses is an industrial hydraulic filter that serves the purpose admirably. A feathering pump is used as a pre-oiler; he obtains 100psi oil pressure prior to cranking. The fully functional propeller is from a DC-3. Being a Packard built Merlin the propeller shaft is a standard SAE #50 spline which offers a whole array of props to choose from. In the photo note the way the front left side (right side in photo) of the trailer is buried in the ground due to torque reaction. A photo cannot convey the unbelievable sound emanating from this engine at any power over about 50un.Hg. It’s no exaggeration to say that the ground shakes and ones insides literally vibrate. No equipment on earth can possibly record the sound, it is simply too overwhelming
Jason's Spitfire with an alternative engine By John Moore
< Back < Back
The model in the photo's is a 60 size world models spitfire which has clocked up many hours. Owing to an unfortunate gravity induced incident the front end has been rebuilt and the plane is not so pretty on the ground. However she looks great in the air and sounds fairly awesome when being pulled around by an SC120 four stroke, which gives an impressive turn of speed. C u r r e n t l y she's fitted with a 91 four stroke as the 120 is now residing in a b l a c k h o r s e P 4 0 C Tomahawk
A Merlin running at 65in.Hg. and 3200rpm. Photo was taken at the airpark where a friend, Graham White lives at Cannon Creek Airpark, Lake City, Florida
He has collected aircraft engines for about 25 years. Currently I have the Merlin, Griffon, P&W R-2800, P&W R-4360 (2), Franklin O-805 (flat 12) and Continental IV-1430. Due to the high manifold pressures he runs he recently added a water injection system to it as insurance against detonation. He has momentarily “blipped” the Merlin to 72in.Hg. and 3300rpm which is well beyond normal takeoff power and even war emergency. The QEC (power plant in Brit speak) is from a Canadair Northstar. I‘ve added modern spin-on oil filtration which filters to 5 microns. The unit he uses is an industrial hydraulic filter that serves the purpose admirably. A feathering pump is used as a pre- oiler; he obtains 100psi oil pressure prior to cranking. The fully functional propeller is from a DC-3. Being a Packard built Merlin the propeller shaft is a standard SAE #50 spline which offers a whole array of props to choose from. In the photo note the way the front left side (right side in photo) of the trailer is buried in the ground due to torque reaction. A photo cannot convey the unbelievable sound emanating from this engine at any power over about 50un.Hg. It’s no exaggeration to say that the ground shakes and ones insides literally vibrate. No equipment on earth can possibly record the sound, it is simply too overwhelming
CONCORD MFC         CONCORD MODEL FLYING CLUB
CONCORD MFC         CONCORD MODEL FLYING CLUB